Garde

Researchers develop an oxygen-ion battery

Lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous today, but that does not mean that they are the best solution for all areas of application. TU Wien has now succeeded in developing an oxygen-ion battery that has some important advantages. Although it does not allow for quite as high energy densities as the lithium-ion battery, its storage capacity does not decrease irrevocably over time: it can be regenerated and thus may enable an extremely long service life.
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Biodegradable artificial muscles: Going green in the field of soft robotics

Artificial muscles are a progressing technology that could one day enable robots to function like living organisms. Such muscles open up new possibilities for how robots can shape the world around us; from assistive wearable devices that can redefine our physical abilities at old age, to rescue robots that can navigate rubble in search of the missing. But just because artificial muscles can have a strong societal impact during use, doesn’t mean they have to leave a strong environmental impact after use.
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What really matters in multi-story building design?

The impact of multi-story building design considerations on embodied emissions, cost, and operational energy has been revealed for the first time. Using a model, researchers estimate that 28% to 44% of yearly heating and cooling energy, and six gigatons of cumulative embodied carbon dioxide equivalent from now until 2050, could be saved in new multi-story buildings by employing certain recommendations and using technology available today.
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Thin oxide films for development of model materials for semiconductors, sensors and batteries

One of the first sights greeting visitors to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) Energy Sciences Center are windows into busy lab spaces. Filled with equipment and researchers going about their work, the film growth lab looks out onto the lobby. It houses a team that creates extremely thin and precise films of different materials.
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An integrated approach to cool: How evaporation and radiation can cool the world

Large-scale, effective, and passive: these descriptions are aptly given to the integrated radiative and evaporative chiller (IREC), designed and tested by researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The goal of this technology is to come up with an energetically affordable method of cooling to aid in the rising consumption of energy while still minimizing carbon emissions through the process.
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